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What's In The Sky This Month: Mars At Opposition & Much More

Saturday, 10 Oct 2020 @ 7:00 PM
3.0 3.0 USD
What's In The Sky This Month: Mars at Opposition & Much More
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Ed Anderson, a member of the Astronomical Society of Long Island (ASLI) and of the Custer Institute, will take us on a tour of things that can be seen in the sky this month. He will highlight objects that are visible to the naked eye, requiring no equipment at all, then he will take us deeper into the universe as he points out celestial sights that are visible with the kind of binoculars that many people own and he'll explore celestial wonders that can be seen with a small to medium sized telescope. Ed will discuss how to find them in the sky, so that after the talk you can try locating them through your own binoculars or telescope or you can just enjoy the view through ours!

This month, look for Mars at opposition. While Jupiter and Saturn appear brightest in the sky near opposition, Mars, a much closer planet, brightens even more dramatically when it is on the opposite side of Earth from the sun. Mars only reaches opposition with Earth about every two years, and viewing conditions for the Red Planet this October are slated to be spectacular! For most of the month of October, the light of Mars will grow brighter than even Jupiter, which is generally the second brightest planet in the sky. The brightness of Mars will peak on October 13 when the planet reaches opposition.

After the session, if the weather is good, he will open the ASLI dome on the grounds of Custer Observatory and turn the 14 Meade LX200 telescope on some of the objects discussed and will be available to answer questions. Custer Observatory staff will also give tours of night sky objects through the Zerochromat telescope in the main Observatory dome and other powerful telescopes on site. Feel free to bring your own binoculars or telescope to look through after the presentation. Or just enjoy the view from ours!

Suggested Donation: $5 Adults, $3 Children Under 12, Members FREE.
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